Cervical Laminoplasty

A cervical laminoplasty is a surgery that reshapes or repositions bone to relieve any excess pressure that is being put on the spinal nerves in the neck. With a laminoplasty the bones are repositioned, whereas with a laminectomy the bones are removed. There are several causes for the spinal canal to narrow, such as spinal stenosis, resulting in the degeneration of the facet joints and intervertebral discs. Bone spurs can also develop and grow into the spinal canal, and the connecting ligaments can thicken. A cervical laminoplasty helps to relieve the pressure put on the spinal nerves by removing the cause of the pressure while maintaining the integrity and stability of your vertebrae. A small incision is made at the back of your neck and a groove is cut into one side of the cervical vertebrae, creating a hinge. The spinous processes are removed to create room for the lamina to open like a door. Any source of compression is removed and small wedges of bone are placed in the “open” space of the door, and then secured into place. Once the soft tissues are eased back into place, the incision is closed. Patients will generally remain in the hospital for two to three days after surgery. Full recovery can take six to eighteen months.

Cervical Laminoplasty Surgery

                                                                                                                     

 

 

Posterior Incision


Decompressed Spinal Cord