Shoulder Arthroplasty

The shoulder is one of the most complicated joints. Spine and Orthopedic Center of New Mexico has an expert staff to treat conditions from soreness to chronic pain. Total shoulder arthroplasty may be recommended if arthritis or degenerative joint disease makes your shoulder stiff and painful, or if the upper arm bone is fractured so badly that tissue death may result.

Shoulder Replacements

Shoulder surgery may be an option you need to consider if you have a hard time rotating your shoulder in every direction, lack strength to carry out normal daily activities, or the shoulder feels like it could pop out of the socket at any moment.

Shoulder Dislocation

If you dislocate your shoulder, your orthopedic surgeon will put it back into place, then immobilize your shoulder for several weeks. If your shoulder dislocation becomes a chronic condition, a brace can sometimes help. When therapy and bracing fail, you may require orthopedic surgery to repair or tighten torn or stretched ligaments in your shoulder.

Rotator Cuff Injury

You may require arthroscopic or miniopen shoulder surgery to treat your rotator cuff, depending on the size, depth, and location of the tear. In orthopedic shoulder arthroscopy, the surgeon makes a minute incision in the shoulder. They insert a minuscule device with a micro camera that sends images along a fiber optic cable to a monitor. Watching the operation on TV, your orthopedic surgeon uses the instrument to remove bone spurs, inflamed muscle, and to repair tears. A total shoulder replacement may be recommended if arthritis or degenerative joint disease makes your shoulder stiff and painful, or if the upper arm bone is fractured so badly that tissue death may result. Orthopedic shoulder replacement surgery replaces damaged surfaces with artificial parts (prostheses). Frozen shoulder surgery is performed when a shoulder has lost all range of motion. It is generally the result of joint inflammation or immobilization due to trauma or surgery. Frozen shoulder surgery is done arthroscopically, but must be maintained with physical therapy to keep a good range of motion and restore function.